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Avoid the ‘jaws’ of debt this Christmas

Cornwall Council News feed - 9 hours 43 min ago

At this time of year people feel under pressure to overspend with many having to borrow more than they can afford in order to pay for Christmas.  With banks and building societies becoming more choosy about their borrowers, Cornwall Council’s Trading Standards are warning local residents not to fall prey to illegal money lenders; Loan Sharks.

Loan Sharks are unregulated and often give cash loans without any paper work and charge extortionate interest rates. When the New Year arrives and you struggle to make the repayments they may use violence, threats and intimidation, to ensure you keep paying them.

Working in partnership with the Illegal Money Lending Team, and using money they have obtained from proceeds of crime, Cornwall Trading Standards has purchased food items offered at cost price from local company Proper Cornish Ltd. These will be distributed by Truro and Camborne Foodbanks to low income families as part of their Christmas food parcels.

Don Gardner who runs the Camborne Food Bank said: “The need in the Camborne, Pool, Redruth (CPR) area during the winter months increases tremendously due to the extra heating requirements for people on low income. This year we are again supporting those families that struggle with the extra expense of  Christmas. The media hype causes many families to find themselves in debt. We at Transformation CPR are providing over 200 families with a Christmas lunch delivered on Christmas Eve, that's more than 1,000 meals!”

Chris Pauling Managing Director of Furniss (Proper Cornish) Ltd stated “During the festive season, which should be a happy family experience, many families have been affected by unscrupulous money lenders. We are proud to be able to support the Illegal Money Lending Team in distributing hampers for those that have been affected.” 

The food has been labelled with the Loan Shark logo and contains details of how to get help and advice if you are bitten by a loan shark.

Geoff Brown, Cabinet Member for Communities said “I am really proud of the work that Trading Standards has been doing to stop the work of loan Sharks in Cornwall. Loan Sharks bring fear and intimidation into the homes of their victims and many families do not realize the loans are unenforceable and that help is available.”

If you think you are in debt to a loan shark, or would like to report one, you can contact the Illegal Money Lending Team for specialist advice in confidence:

Call: 0300 555 2222 (local call rate, 24 hour helpline) 

Email: reportaloanshark@stoploansharks.gov.uk

Text: loan (space) shark (space) + your message to 60003

Web: www.gov.uk/report-loan-shark

Story posted: 7 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

£115,000 in Community Chest grants awarded to voluntary and community groups in Cornwall

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 12/06/2016 - 09:41

Hundreds of voluntary and community groups in Cornwall have benefited from Cornwall Council Community Chest grants worth £115,000 over the last seven months.  Others could benefit if they apply before the closing date of 17 February 2017.

Every year each of Cornwall Council’s 123 councillors has a total fund of £2,000 to support projects run by not for profit groups in their local area.  So far this year they have handed out 440 grants that have benefited a wide range of people and activities from community facilities and environmental projects to schemes promoting healthy living, music and sport.

Cornwall councillors have given grants towards everything from lawn mowers for recreation pitches to a night-time parade of illuminated bicycles.  Many groups have used the grants to attract match funding, leading to over £1.9m more pouring in to local projects and organisations.

Jeremy Rowe, Cornwall Council Localism Portfolio Holder, said: “Community Chest grants support a wide range of projects and groups that make a difference to so many individuals and communities across Cornwall.

“Many of Cornwall’s voluntary and community groups use these small grants to secure match funding from other grant providers, boosting their value many times over and greatly increasing their benefit to local communities.

“Some councillors have already committed all their funding to projects this year, but there’s still funding available in some areas.  Get in touch with your local Cornwall councillor to find out whether they can support an application from your group.”

Not for profit groups can apply for Community Chest grants of between £100 and £1,000.  Details are available on our Community Chest page and the closing date for applications is 17 February 2017. 

Some of the groups that have received Community Chest grants this year include:

East Cornwall
  • Bodmin Youth FC - £500 for Under 14s team kit
  • Marhamchurch Pre-School - £350 to improve an outdoor learning area
  • Moorland Community Cinema - £415 for cinema equipment
  • Gunnislake Amateur Dramatics - £500 towards an annual show
  • Junkyard Skatepark CIC - £496.93 for equipment for coaching sessions
  • Stoke Climsland Carers Group - £300 for a carers’ get together
  • Darite Lunch Club - £300 for kitchen equipment
  • Wadebridge and District Chamber of Commerce - £960 for a community bus
Mid Cornwall
  • Wheal Martyn - £500 for activities for a memory café
  • Newquay Food Bank - £250 for a fresh produce project
  • St Newlyn East Parish Council - £500 for installation of a multisport court
  • St Austell Torchlight Carnival - £200 for a steel band
  • St Blaise Hands Together Residents Association – £200 for a communal garden mosaic
  • Truro Homeless Action Group - £150 for winter warm clothes
West Cornwall
  • Illogan Sparnon Band - £250 for instruments and music
  • Falmouth and Penryn Sea Cadets - £1,000 for a new floor
  • St Ives Surf Life Saving Club - £533 for a surf ski
  • Carleen Village Hall - £250 for a defibrillator
  • Goldsithney Christmas Lights - £500 for Christmas lights

Story posted 6 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Health and care on the agenda for the China Clay Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 12/05/2016 - 15:52

Residents of the China Clay area are invited to find out about future plans for local health and care at the China Clay Community Network Panel meeting on Monday 12 December.

Representatives from leading health and social care organisations will brief the panel on the draft Sustainability and Transformation Plan. This is a five year plan to improve local health and wellbeing, the quality of services and financial stability. There will be an opportunity to discuss the draft plans, share views and help shape the proposals for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly. This plan is part of a new national approach by the NHS and full details of the proposals and engagement opportunities are available at www.cornwall.gov.uk/shapethefuture.

Those attending will also be able to learn about the progress being made in relation to other schemes including the potential St Austell to A30 transport link and an update on the Cornwall Energy Recovery Centre (CERC) being built in St Dennis. Information about these initiatives can be found on the Cornwall Council website respectively: (www.cornwall.gov.uk/a30tostaustell) and (www.cornwall.gov.uk/cerc).

There will also be an update on the economic development work being led by the St Austell Bay Economic Forum (SABEF) which includes projects in the China Clay area such as the proposed technology park at West Carclaze.

The public are welcome to attend and a period of time is allocated for people to ask questions about any issues that may be concerning them.

Cornwall Councillor Dick Cole and Chair for the meeting, said: “Local people have an opportunity to hear from health and social care representatives about the next stage of the NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plan. This is a significant document for the future of the NHS in Cornwall and many people are very concerned about what this will mean for them and their families. Everyone is welcome, please come along and ask your questions.”

The China Clay Community network panel meets every two months to discuss matters that affect the local area and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and its partners such as the police and health services. In recent meetings the Panel has focused on the delivery of Cornwall Council services in the China Clay area including housing, planning, transport and highway issues, developing the local economy, the environment, conservation and community safety.

The China Clay Community Network Panel includes all six Cornwall Councillors for the area, representatives of the five Parish Councils (Roche, St Dennis, St Enoder, St Stephen-in-Brannel and Treverbyn) in the community network area.

This meeting is on Monday 12 December 2016 from 7pm to 9pm at the Bugle Chapel Room, Fore Street, Bugle, PL26 8PF. The agenda and more information about the panel can be found on the China Clay Community Network area webpage.

 

Posted 5 December

Categories: Cornwall

Health and care plan and policing on the agenda for Launceston Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 12/05/2016 - 14:38

People in and around Launceston are being invited to have their say on NHS plans to transform health and care in Cornwall and to find out more about the Police and Crime Plan at the Launceston Community Network Panel meeting on Thursday 15 December in Launceston Town Hall.

Representatives from leading health and social care organisations will brief the panel on the draft Sustainability and Transformation Plan - a five year plan to improve local health and wellbeing, the quality of services and financial stability. There will be an opportunity to discuss the draft plans, share views and help shape the proposals. Full details on the proposals and engagement opportunities are available at www.cornwall.gov.uk/shapethefuture 

Andrew White, Chief Executive from the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, will brief the panel on the Police and Crime Plan.  Vashti Pearce will be on hand to tell the panel about her role and responsibilities as a pilot Police Community Management Officer.

There will also be an update on applications to the Local Devolution Fund, which can be used to help local councils and organisations take on the running of services and property in the network area as well as supporting partnership working.                

Cornwall Councillor Neil Burden, Chair of Launceston Community Network Panel, said: “The Sustainability and Transformation Plan will affect everyone in Cornwall.  I would urge people to come and find out what it means for them and to take the opportunity to comment either at the meeting, online or at one of the community events being held across Cornwall in January.

“Policing is another important issue for most people, and the community network panel meeting is a chance to learn about how things will be changing in the future.  There will also be time to ask questions and meet your local Cornwall, town and parish councillors.”

Launceston Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and partners such as the police and health services.  The panel’s current priorities include local health provision, road and broadband infrastructure, and neighbourhood planning.

Launceston Community Network Panel includes all five Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the 16 parishes in the community network: Altarnun, Boyton, Egloskerry, Laneast, Launceston, Lawhitton, Lewannick, Lezant, North Hill, North Petherwin, South Petherwin, St Stephens by Launceston, St Thomas the Apostle, Stoke Climsland, Trewen and Werrington.

The meeting takes place on Thursday 15 December from 7.00pm to 9.00pm in the Guildhall in Launceston Town Hall.  The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Launceston Community Network page.

Story posted 5 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Camelford Community Network Panel meeting to discuss air quality and proposals to transform health and care

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 12/05/2016 - 10:36

People in the Camelford area can learn about plans to improve local air quality and proposals to transform health and care in Cornwall at the Camelford Community Network Panel meeting on Tuesday 13 December in Camelford Hall.

Eloise Travis from Cornwall Council’s Public Protection team will provide an update on the latest air quality monitoring results for Camelford and the recent public consultation on declaring the town an Air Quality Management Area.

Representatives from leading health and social care organisations will brief the panel on the draft Sustainability and Transformation Plan - a five year plan to improve local health and wellbeing, the quality of services and financial stability. There will be an opportunity to discuss the draft plans, share views and help shape the proposals. Full details on the proposals and engagement opportunities are available at www.cornwall.gov.uk/shapethefuture 

Cornwall Councillor Rob Rotchell, Chair of Camelford Community Network Panel, said: “This is a good opportunity to come along and find out more about some of the big issues for Camelford and for Cornwall.  We know that Camelford will need to be designated as an Air Quality Management Area and once that happens we can look at an action plan to improve the town’s air quality, which could include some of the suggestions people put forward in the recent consultation.

“We also know that there are big changes planned for local health and care services, and this meeting gives people a chance to find out about what’s proposed and have their say.”

Camelford Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and partners such as the police and health services.  Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues. 

Camelford Community Network Panel includes the Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the following parishes: Advent, Camelford, Davidstow, Forrabury and Minster, Lesnewth, Michaelstow, Otterham, St Breward, St Clether, St Juliot, St Teath, Tintagel, Tremaine, Treneglos, Tresmeer, Trevalga and Warbstow.

The meeting takes place on Tuesday 13 December from 7.00pm to 9.00pm in the Committee Room, Camelford Hall, Clease Road, Camelford.  The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Camellford Community Network page.  The meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend.

Story posted 5 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Nature does a lot for us… you can do a lot for nature……. Cornwall leads the way with the Environmental Growth Strategy

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 12/05/2016 - 09:57

The Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Nature Partnership (CIoSLNP) and Cornwall Council have officially launched Cornwall’s ‘Environmental Growth Strategy' which aims to encourage businesses, communities and individuals to work together to increase environmental, social and economic prosperity in Cornwall. A first of its kind, environmental growth is focused on helping nature to do more for us.

Formally launching the Strategy at this year’s Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Nature Partnership Annual Conference on 2 December,  Edwina Hannaford, the Council’s Portfolio Holder for Planning, told delegates “This Environmental Growth Strategy is not just a Council document: it is a strategy to ensure Cornwall has a sustainable future.”

“This is important because we continue to witness the decline of nature in Cornwall” added Professor Kevin Gaston, co-chair of the Local Nature Partnership.  “Once common species, such as the hedgehog are becoming increasingly rare.  We need environmental growth because protection has not proved to be enough; we are committed to leaving Cornwall in a better state than we inherited it in.”

Matthew Thomson, co-chair of the CIoSLNP, also urged everyone to do their bit; “We rely on Cornwall’s environment and natural systems for food, clean air, water and to underpin our quality of life: Cornwall’s brand is defined by our location and unique environment.“ he said. “Nature does a lot for us…. We must do all we can for nature” .

Councillor Hannaford is making sure the Council is leading action on the Strategy delivery. “This is a Strategy for every business, every community and every individual person in Cornwall to put into action to help deliver environmental growth in their sectors, neighbourhoods and lives.

“There are many ways the Council can help to deliver environmental growth.  Our first major success is that we have recently secured £3.5million of European Regional Development Funds to match Council funding to create nature-rich habitats across a number of public open spaces as part of the our Green Infrastructure for Growth project; making them better places for wildlife and for people.” 

Following the formal launch of the Strategy at the conference, a wide range of businesses, individuals and organisations pledged to also do their bit towards achieving environmental growth in Cornwall.

To find out more about the strategy and what you can do to help see  www.cornwall.gov.uk/environmentalgrowth

Story posted: 2 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall leads the way with Environmental Growth Strategy

Cornwall Council News feed - Fri, 12/02/2016 - 16:53

The Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Nature Partnership (CIoSLNP) and Cornwall Council have officially launched Cornwall’s ‘Environmental Growth Strategy' which aims to encourage businesses, communities and individuals to work together to increase environmental, social and economic prosperity in Cornwall. A first of its kind, environmental growth is focused on helping nature to do more for us.

Formally launching the Strategy at this year’s Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Nature Partnership Annual Conference on 2 December,  Edwina Hannaford, the Council’s Portfolio Holder for Planning, told delegates “This Environmental Growth Strategy is not just a Council document: it is a strategy to ensure Cornwall has a sustainable future.”

“This is important because we continue to witness the decline of nature in Cornwall” added Professor Kevin Gaston, co-chair of the Local Nature Partnership.  “Once common species, such as the hedgehog are becoming increasingly rare.  We need environmental growth because protection has not proved to be enough; we are committed to leaving Cornwall in a better state than we inherited it in.”

Matthew Thomson, co-chair of the CIoSLNP, also urged everyone to do their bit; “We rely on Cornwall’s environment and natural systems for food, clean air, water and to underpin our quality of life: Cornwall’s brand is defined by our location and unique environment.“ he said. “Nature does a lot for us…. We must do all we can for nature”.

Councillor Hannaford is making sure the Council is leading action on the Strategy delivery. “This is a Strategy for every business, every community and every individual person in Cornwall to put into action to help deliver environmental growth in their sectors, neighbourhoods and lives.

“There are many ways the Council can help to deliver environmental growth.  Our first major success is that we have recently secured £3.5m of European Regional Development Funds to match Council funding to create nature-rich habitats across a number of public open spaces as part of the our Green Infrastructure for Growth project; making them better places for wildlife and for people.”  

Following the formal launch of the Strategy at the conference, a wide range of businesses, individuals and organisations pledged to also do their bit towards achieving environmental growth in Cornwall.

 

Story posted 02 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Council highly commended in prestigious national award presentation

Cornwall Council News feed - Fri, 12/02/2016 - 15:11

Cornwall Council and the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s work in producing guidance for local communities to help them assess landscape when developing their neighbourhoods has been highly commended in the prestigious Landscape Institute Awards.

The Public Space Team of Cornwall Council and the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Unit were highly commended for their work, ‘Assessing a Cornish Sense of Place – Local Landscape Character Assessment’ which has produced guidance to help communities assess their landscape with a view to preserving Cornwall’s character and natural heritage when developing their Neighbourhood Development Plan.

The LI Awards are presented to landscape professionals in recognition of their outstanding work, and to encourage excellence. Every year, the LI applauds those working on the most innovative projects to have shaped, restored and protected the natural and built environment.

Cornwall Council cabinet member for planning Edwina Hannaford said: “Retaining a landscape architect within the natural environment team demonstrates Cornwall Council’s commitment to protecting our precious environment which is so important to our social well-being, bio diversity and our economy. We trade on our good looks so any way we can help communities better understand the value of the landscape will help them create policies through their neighbourhood plans, to protect and enhance the landscape from inappropriate development and raise the quality of design.

The collaboration with the Cornwall Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty team demonstrates the importance of working together. I would like to thank both the Council’s natural environment team and the AONB unit for their dedication and expertise which had been recognised nationally as best practice with the awarding of this prestigious award.”

The Landscape Institute’s judges said “We are aware of the shortage of staff in local authorities for this kind of work, so the training programme made this entry stand out.”

Story posted: 30 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Keeping warm safely

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 12/01/2016 - 15:43

Cornwall Trading Standards are advising homeowners in Cornwall to check that their solid fuel, oil and gas appliances are installed properly, cleaned, maintained and regularly serviced before using them this winter.

Recent work by Trading Standards officers has highlighted that some homeowners are not using suitably qualified tradespeople to install these appliances. Appliances should be installed, commissioned and serviced by a suitably qualified, competent person, who will check the location it will be positioned in, flue/liner requirements and confirm the suitability for the home.  The instruction manual for the appliance should have full details for the specific make and model.

The hearth, walls, chimney and adjacency of other structures must be non-combustible and sufficiently far away to conform to current Building Regulations requirements. An air space should be left around all sides of the appliance before or after installation in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions.

Installations are normally carried out under a “competent person scheme” Installers will provide the necessary certification and should also be competent to carry out regular servicing. If an installation is carried out under a competent person scheme, the appropriate body (i.e. HETAS/OFTEC) controlling the work notifies the Local Authority of the installation and it is then registered on the Local Authority database for public record.

Solid fuel and oil appliances (not gas) can be installed on a DIY basis but , in these cases, either the homeowner or the installer must make a Building Regulations application to the Local Authority or an “Approved Inspector” prior to commencing the work, who will then inspect the works for compliance. It is illegal to work on gas appliances unless qualified so DIY installations for these are not allowed, including conversions to gas or gas work after supply. 

Owners are responsible for regularly maintaining and servicing their appliance. A competent, qualified engineer should be used to avoid faults caused by misuse, neglect, tampering, accident or normal wear and tear, as these are not the responsibility of the supplier. Once installed, regular checks ensure that it performs safely and efficiently to avoid a build-up of toxic fumes.

When burning coke, anthracite, smokeless fuel, logs or peat the flue should be cleaned in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions. Chimneys should be swept annually and the soot box checked every 3 months. For Range cookers the hot plate should be removed and the flue way at the top of the oven should be cleaned every 3 months so soot does not build up.

Clothes and combustible objects should not be placed next to or hung on the appliance as it restricts airflow and can cause carbon monoxide to build up or an unwanted house fire. To comply with the Building Regulations, a new installation should include the fitting of an appropriately positioned carbon monoxide alarm. 

Watch Manager Katie Hoskins added “Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service provide a FREE Home fire safety service throughout the year, this includes replacement of old or defective smoke detection free of charge and advice on escape plans and carbon monoxide awareness information. For more information please take a look at our website or contact 0800 3581 999". 

When using appliances children and the elderly are considered a particular risk. A fire guard, keeping the area clear of combustible materials and trip hazards and regular cleaning and maintenance will help to minimise risk.

Appliances are relatively easy to clean and manufacturer instructions should be followed. DO NOT use 'oven cleaners' or ‘Cillit Bang’ type products. For Range cookers safely remove fluff or dust around the burner door or the flue chamber with a soft brush as it can restrict air supply and cause toxic fumes to build up (similar to a tumble drier filter collecting dust). Never use a vacuum cleaner, when the burner is alight.

Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards, said: “The geography of Cornwall means that solid fuel and oil heating is a popular method of heating homes .  It is important to use a qualified engineer because of the risks of poor installation which could result in a fatality.

“From a Trading Standards perspective we deal with a range of safety issues around fuel appliances. There is a need in Cornwall to provide training on safe installation and we are currently exploring the prospect of HETAS setting up a solid fuel training facility in West Cornwall to support local businesses and promote public protection”.

If you are an engineer interested in enrolling on a course please contact HETAS on 01684 278170

 

Story posted 01 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

We want to know when you think dogs should be allowed on beaches

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 12/01/2016 - 13:45

Many people enjoy walking on Cornwall’s beautiful beaches but not everyone likes or enjoys dogs.

If you enjoy walking or spending a day on the beach with or without a dog Cornwall Council want to hear from you about dogs on beaches.

Dogs are restricted on some beaches at certain times of the year. The legislation that controls and restricts dogs from public spaces has been changed by the Government and the Council has to decide how to apply the new rules on beaches in Cornwall.

The existing legislation, called Dog Control Orders, is changing to Public Space Protection Orders which are known as PSPOs. The Council is proposing to incorporate all the existing conditions, times, dates and durations of dogs on beaches restrictions with new PSPOs; meaning dogs would be allowed on designated beaches at the same times as they are allowed now. Guide dogs will not be affected by the changes and are allowed on beaches, even where dog bans are in place.

If you want to let the Council know what you think about how we propose to introduce the new PSPOs or dog restrictions on all or specific beaches in Cornwall.

Complete the survey 

You can complete the Dogs on Beaches online survey or email your comments to: communityandenvironmentalprotection@cornwall.gov.uk

The survey runs from 25 November to 12 January 2017.

A list of the beaches and current dog restrictions, maps of the areas affected, and Frequently Asked Questions about PSPOs, is also available on our dogs on beaches consultation webpage and in local libraries, information services and one stops shops.

Geoff Brown, Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Communities said “In introducing the new PSPOs, that restrict dogs from beaches at specific times, we have an opportunity to review the existing restrictions. We want to know if people agree with how we propose to introduce the new legislation and also if they think we should change any of the existing conditions on any or all of the beaches.”

Geoff added “We recognise that dog owners like to be able to walk their dogs on beaches; however we also appreciate that not everyone likes or enjoys dogs. We have to decide when and where dogs should be allowed on beaches that we are responsible for and we want to know if the current conditions are still appropriate. So it’s really important that people let us know now if they think we need to make any changes.”

PSPOs can restrict how and when dogs are allowed on beaches and other public places, and may restrict where you can walk your dog, on or off the lead, and how many dogs you can walk at one time. Public Spaces Protection Orders make it an offence if a person in charge of a dog fails to clean up its faeces.

Beaches where dog bans apply are patrolled on a regular basis and if any of the conditions of the new PSPOs are breached the Council’s dog wardens can issue a fine, called a Fixed Penalty Notice, of £100 and tell the dog owner to remove their dog from the beach immediately. If anyone is issued with a fine but doesn’t pay they may be prosecuted, and could be fined up to £1,000.

Breaching the conditions of a PSPO can be, for example, if someone has a dog on a beach during the ban period, not having their dog on a lead, or not cleaning up if their dog fouls on the beach. 

What people tell us, as part of this public engagement exercise, will help the Council decide whether or not to issue a PSPO at the sites proposed.

It’s important that people realise that beaches that are privately owned may have their own restrictions for dogs; although the Government’s new legislation means that Town and Parish Councils and other beach owners who want to control, restrict or exclude dogs on their beach will have to request a PSPO from Cornwall Council.

More information

If you would like to let the Council know your views about dogs on beaches please complete the online survey or email: communityandenvironmentalprotection@cornwall.gov.uk

More information about Dog Control Orders and PSPOs is available on the Council’s website: www.cornwall.gov.uk/dogsonbeaches or from the Councils Community Protection Team, by phone: 0300 1234 212 or by email: communityandenvironmentalprotection@cornwall.gov.uk

Story posted 28 November 2016

 

Categories: Cornwall

Community groups celebrate at St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 12/01/2016 - 12:28

Community groups that have benefited from Cornwall Councillor Community Chest grants will be going along to the St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel on Thursday 8 December.

Several groups that have received grants will tell the panel how the funding has helped them, including the St Austell Arts Centre, Trevarrick Residents Association, People and Gardens CIC, START Clothing Bank and Poltair Residents Association.

Each Cornwall Councillor has a small Community Chest grant to help fund initiatives run by voluntary and community groups in the area they represent. The grants can be used for a wide range of groups and activities. These include helping vulnerable children or adults, helping young people, providing facilities for older people, supporting community facilities, local environment projects and projects to tackle community safety issues.

Cornwall Councillor Jackie Bull, Chair of St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel, said: “We’re keen to celebrate the various initiatives in the area which have been supported by Cornwall Councillor Community Chest Grants in the last year. The grants have helped fund a variety of local facilities and activities including updating a heating system, seating area improvements, storage equipment and a Halloween Party. Community Chest grants are really valued by local community groups. Everyone is welcome to come along and hear from some of the groups that have benefitted as well as meet their local Parish, Town and Cornwall Councillors.”

The St Austell and Mevagissey Panel meets usually quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council, and its partners such as the police and health services.

Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel includes all seven Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the eight Town or Parish parishes in the community network: Carlyon, Mevagissey, Pentewan, St Austell Bay, St Austell Town, St Ewe, St Goran, St Mewan.

The public meeting takes place on Thursday 8 December from 7pm to 9pm at the Council Chamber, St Austell One Stop Shop, Penwinnick Road. The agenda and more information about the panel can be found on the St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network page.

For more information visit the Cornwall Councillor Community Chest Grant Scheme page. 

Story posted 1 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

International Day for Disabled People - Equipment Amnesty

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 12/01/2016 - 12:19

This Saturday 03 December, Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety (CFRCS) Service are working in partnership with Disability Cornwall and Isles of Scilly to recycle unwanted mobility aids, which are then sent to those in urgent need.

Jane Johnson, Chief Executive of the charity said “What better way to mark this international day, than to help others less fortunate overseas and we are grateful to Cornwall Fire Rescue and Community Safety Service for enabling us to have drop off points across Cornwall”.

Mountains of mobility equipment and aids are dumped or left rusting in garages across the county, forgotten and unused every year. Disability Cornwall and Isles of Scilly visited Kenya in 2014 working with Disability Wales and ResponsABLE Assistance and saw for themselves hundreds of children and adults struggling to survive without the equipment they need. Some had no independent living aids at all and spent their lives on the floor, or, at best, had the most basic equipment which in many cases was unsuitable and unsafe, like wheelchairs which were too small or large or were missing wheels. This is preventing many disabled people from doing the most basic things such as getting to school, having a job and being part of their community.

Paul Walker Chief Fire Officer said: “I am very pleased with this partnership work with Disability Cornwall to help vulnerable people and support International Day for Disabled People. Recycling unwanted mobility aids can change people’s lives for the better and I thank all those involved in the collection and distribution. We need your help please…. local residents and communities in Cornwall, support this work by clearing out loft spaces, sheds, garages and spare rooms and dropping unused or unwanted mobility aids into the community fire stations listed”. 

Please help us make life better for disabled people in Kenya by bringing any unwanted mobility aids: wheelchairs, scooters, reachers, walking aids, seats, anything at all, to your nearest participating Community Fire Station.

The 7 wholetime stations across Cornwall will be ready to receive your unwanted mobility aids from 10am – 3pm

  • Penzance Community Fire Station
  • Tolvaddon Community Fire Station
  • Falmouth Community Fire Station
  • Truro Emergency Services Community Station
  • Newquay Community Fire Station
  • St Austell Community Fire Station
  • Bodmin Community Fire Station

NHS equipment will be recycled within the system and all other equipment will be shipped to the Kenya Disabled People’s Organisation and schools for disabled children we work with.

Story posted 01 December 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel to discuss Public Rights of Way and NHS Sustainability & Transformation Plan

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 12/01/2016 - 08:29

Residents of the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel area are invited to the December meeting of the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include the NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP), Public Rights of Way, local policing and the Local Devolution Fund.

All are invited to attend the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel meeting which takes place on Wednesday 7 December between 6pm and 8pm at Cury Village Hall, Helston.

Representatives from NHS Kernow and Cornwall Council will be attending the panel to talk about the NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP).  The STP is a five year plan required by NHS England to improve the health and wellbeing of our local population, improve the quality of local health and care services, and deliver financial stability in the local health and care system. This takes forward the work which was progressed under the Cornwall Deal and health and social care integration, with health and care organisations coming together to co-create one plan, one budget, one system to better serve citizens in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

Also on the agenda is the consideration of Local Devolution Fund applications,  a presentation from Police Constable Philip Nankivell about Livestock in fields with Public Rights of Way and there will also be an opportunity to talk to a local police officer and the panel about the local policing priorities for Helston and South Kerrier.

Cornwall Councillor Carolyn Rule, Chair of Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel said: “I would like to extend a very warm welcome to everyone to come along to the community network meeting, we have a very interesting agenda, as always, and would really value your input into the debate. The police have a regular slot on our agenda so you will have an opportunity to interact with them, we will be discussing the latest round of bids for the local devolution fund and value your opinion on those. We will have a presentation on footpaths and finally a presentation on the STP, this will be your opportunity to understand and make input to this 5 year transformational plan where we all know we have to do things differently going forward. There is a real willingness for the council’s adult social care and the health services to work together to provide the holistic care package needed for our communities. We as residents also have a part to play in this and it would be good to hear your views.”

The Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local community and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and other agencies including the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The panel comprises all seven Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives from the 18 parishes in the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network - Breage, Crowan, Cury, Germoe, Grade-Ruan, Gunwalloe, Gweek, Helston, Landewednack, Manaccan, Mawgan-in-Meneage, Mullion, Porthleven, Sithney, St. Anthony-in-Meneage, St. Keverne, St. Martin-in-Meneage and Wendron.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings  can be found on the Cornwall Council Helston and South Kerrier Community Network webpage

Story posted 30 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Hayle and St Ives Community Network Panel to discuss NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plan and Neighbourhood Planning

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 11/30/2016 - 15:37

Residents of the Hayle and St Ives Community Network Panel area are invited to the December meeting of the Hayle and St Ives Community Network Panel, items on the agenda include the NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plan, Neighbourhood Planning and a local policing update.

All are invited to attend the Hayle and St Ives Community Network Panel meeting which takes place on Monday 5 December between 6pm and 8pm at the Carbis Bay Memorial Hall, Carbis Bay, St Ives.

Representatives from NHS Kernow and Cornwall Council will be attending the panel to talk about the NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP).  The STP is a five year plan required by NHS England to improve the health and wellbeing of our local population, improve the quality of local health and care services, and deliver financial stability in the local health and care system. This takes forward the work which was progressed under the Cornwall Deal and health and social care integration, with health and care organisations coming together to co-create one plan, one budget, one system to better serve citizens in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

In addition to this Devon and Cornwall Police Inspector Jean Phillips will be attending the meeting to introduce Sergeant Gemma Freestone and there will also be an update on Neighbourhood Planning.

Cornwall Councillor Lionel Pascoe, Chair for this meeting of the Hayle and St Ives Community Network Panel, said: “All are invited to attend the December meeting of the Hayle & St Ives Community Network Panel. These meetings are a great opportunity to feedback your views and be informed about local decisions so please do come along if you would like to be involved.”

The Hayle and St Ives Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local community and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and other agencies including the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The panel comprises all six Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the five parishes in the Hayle and St Ives Community Network - Gwinear-Gwithian and St Erth, Hayle North, Hayle South, Lelant and Carbis Bay, St Ives North and St Ives South.

More information about the Community Network Panel and dates for future meetings can be found on the Hayle and St Ives Community Network page

Story posted 30 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Preventing ill health and more care at home are at the heart of health and social care plans for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 13:14

Health and care organisations in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly have published today their outline proposals for service transformation over the next five years.

The local Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP) is a response to the NHS England Five Year Forward View and Devolution Deal for Cornwall to achieve three aims:

  • Improve the health and wellbeing of the local population.
  • Improve the quality of local health and care services.
  • Deliver financial stability in the local health and care system.

The Transformation Board which is made up of all the leaders from the major public sector health and care organisations is engaging with clinicians, practitioners, stakeholders and most importantly citizens to shape future services.

In the latest plans (Draft Outline Business Case), health and care leaders set out the priorities, principles and actions for the next five years and seek the views of the local population on the work so far.

From Monday 28 November until Friday 20 January, citizens will have a chance to have their say on the local draft plans through a survey or series of community events. Following this period of engagement, detailed plans will be developed with consultation on any major service changes taking place from the summer 2017.

The focus within the latest STP document is on preventing ill health and providing as much care as possible at home or in the community. At the moment care is too reactive, not achieving best outcomes and based on an expensive hospital based model that is now outdated.

On preventing ill health, we know that today 5 lifestyle behaviours – alcohol, smoking, physical inactivity, diet and social isolation – contribute to 5 diseases which cause 75% of premature death and disability. In Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly too many of us are not living well and 20% of NHS costs are associated with these harmful lifestyle behaviours. 

We also know that we need to provide more care at home. Right now around 60 people each day are staying in a bed at Royal Cornwall Hospitals and they don’t need to be there. 35% of community hospital bed days are being used by people who are fit to leave. A third of people in a community hospital or nursing/residential care are not in an appropriate place. Much of this is because we have our resources and money in the wrong place and sadly this is affecting older people the most.

Phil Confue, Senior Responsible Officer for the Sustainability and Transformation Plan and Chief Executive of the Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust says: “In the next five years, we have a once in a generation opportunity to change the way we provide health and social care services for the people of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

“The current health and social care system needs reform and we must seize the moment. Lifestyles, communities and technology have changed and our approach has become outdated, fragmented and reactive.  Local services must adapt to meet the needs of the current and future population - including those who visit our region each year. We must put more focus and resources into preventing ill health, keeping people in their homes or communities and adapting services for a growing, ageing and technology enabled population.

“We want to continue to involve the local community in developing the solutions in the months ahead and we want to hear from as many people as possible on the priorities and approach we are taking. The time and opportunity has come to take control and shape our own future.”

To read more about the local health and social care plans and all the related documents, including survey and community engagement events visit www.cornwall.gov.uk/shapethefuture.

Posted 28 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council’s County Hall Lys Kernow opens its doors to members of the public

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 11/28/2016 - 08:53

Cornwall Council’s County Hall Lys Kernow building is opening its doors to members of the public on Tuesday, 29 November.

The special Open Day, which will run from 10am – 3pm, is part of the celebrations taking place to mark the building’s 50th anniversary.

County Hall was opened by Her Majesty The Queen in 1966 and is a Grade 11 listed building because of its architectural and historic interest.  The building has recently been renovated as part of the Council’s modern working programme and now supports over 1,000 staff, twice as many as it was originally designed to house.

Council Chairman Ann Kerridge wants to encourage as many people as possible to help mark this very special date in the history of the building.

“I hope that people who have never had the opportunity to visit County Hall will come along to view our public spaces and learn more about the importance of its architecture and the craftsmen and designers who were involved in its creation. “ she said.

“50 years is a significant milestone for any modern building to reach and I think it is fitting to invite the public, all of whom are affected in some way by the decisions made here, to be able to see where they are made.”

People visiting County Hall on 29 November will have the opportunity to tour the public areas of the building and see some of the building’s highlights – including the iconic sculpture ‘Rock Form, Porthcurno’ which was commissioned from Dame Barbara Hepworth especially for the courtyard of County Hall and the Italian marble staircase. 

They will also be able to see the original 1960s furniture in the Long Gallery which has been in daily use for over 50 years, and the courtyard garden designed by Geoffrey Jellicoe, one of the 20th century’s leading landscape architects. 

Story posted: 25 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Statement from Cornwall Council and CORMAC following the inquest into the death of Susan Norman

Cornwall Council News feed - Fri, 11/25/2016 - 15:37

Speaking on behalf of Cornwall Council and CORMAC, Kate Kennally, Cornwall Council’s Chief Executive, said:

“Before commenting on the verdict of the jury I would like, on behalf of Cornwall Council, to apologise to Mrs Norman’s family and friends and express our sincere condolences for their loss.  

“Having heard the evidence and findings of the jury we recognise that there are a number of matters which require the attention of the Council and its staff. Clearly, given the amount of comment, the Council and CORMAC now need to consider the details carefully.

“Our priority has been, and continues to be, the safety of the public and both the Council and CORMAC will give careful thought to the conclusions and matters that have been raised.

“However you will appreciate that, as court proceedings have already been lodged against the Council and CORMAC, it would not be appropriate to comment in more detail about what has been said today.  When conclusions of this type are made in such tragic circumstances it is important for the Council and CORMAC to carefully study the implications before responding further”. 

Story posted: 25 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Digital access and health and care on the agenda for Wadebridge and Padstow Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 12:23

People living in the Wadebridge and Padstow Community Network area can learn more about digital access to services and future plans for local health and care at the Wadebridge and Padstow Community Network Panel meeting on 1 December.

Representatives from Health and Social Care at Cornwall Council and NHS Kernow colleagues will be briefing the network panel on the development of the NHS five year plan to improve health and care services in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly. This plan, known as the Sustainability and Transformation Plan, is part of a new national approach by the NHS to help ensure that health and care services are built around the needs of local populations.

In addition to this, Debbie Fox will be on hand to talk about Cornwall Council’s work to encourage more people to go online, which includes training more than 500 people aged between 60 and 90 to use the internet in the last year.

Cornwall Councillor Stephen Knightley, Chair of Wadebridge and Padstow Community Network Panel, said: “Health and care are important issues for all of us, and I would invite everyone to come along and hear about the very different system that is planned for the future.  There’s also a chance to find out more about Cornwall Council’s online services, web chat facility and help for internet novices.  All of these are good news for local people since they allow people to access Council services round the clock whether they’re at home or on the move.”

Wadebridge and Padstow Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and partners such as the police and health services.  The panel’s priorities include public transport, asset and service devolution, affordable housing, highways, traffic and parking issues.

Wadebridge and Padstow Community Network Panel includes all five Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the 14 parishes in the community network: Egloshayle, Padstow, St Breock, St Endellion, St Ervan, St Eval, St Issey, St Kew, St Mabyn, St Merryn, St Minver Highlands, St Minver Lowlands, St Tudy and Wadebridge.

The meeting takes place on Thursday 1 December at 6.30pm at Egloshayle Pavilion, Wadebridge.  The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Wadebridge and Padstow Community Network page.  The meeting is open to the public.

Story posted 23 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Carers Rights Day event

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 12:22

A special event for carers in Cornwall is being held at the St Austell One Stop Shop on Friday 25 November as part of this year’s Carers Rights Day.

Carers are being invited to drop-in to the One Stop Shop between 11am – 2pm to meet with local service providers. 

Representatives from a range of organisations and agencies, including Job Centre Plus, Community Energy Plus, Alfi, Tremorvah, Kernow Carers Service, Family Information Service (FIS) and Adult Social Services – Carer’s Assessment team will be on hand to offer valuable information and advice on support available.

Following the recent launch of Kernow Carers Service, the event will also provide an opportunity for carers to meet some of the Service’s Carer Support Workers, who can offer information on a range of topics including advocacy, grants, planning for the future, activities, events and training. The Service also organises short breaks for young carers and holds the Carers’ Register.

The Carers Rights Day event, which is being organised jointly by Kernow Carers Service and the FIS , is open to unpaid carers of any age.

“Often people don’t regard themselves as a carer, instead they think they are just ‘helping’” said Rebecca Patterson, Team Leader of the Family Information Service “This can stop many seeking help”.

“Caring can take many forms such as assisting with cooking, cleaning and shopping.  A carer helps to look after another person who is not able to manage alone.  We want people to realise what an important role they are playing and that they are not alone, support is available.  So we would like to encourage carers to come along to the St Austell One Stop Shop between 11 am and 2pm on Friday to find out what help and support is available to possibly make their caring role a little easier.’

Andrew Wallis, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Young People, is also supporting the event. “I am fully supportive of this endeavour and hope as many people as possible to come along to get the help and information they need from this event” he said. 

“Carers of all ages deserve our praise for carrying out what can be a very difficult role, often without help. It is, therefore, very important we help and support carers across Cornwall to get the information they need.”

For further information, please contact Kernow Carers Service on 0800 587 8191.

Story posted: 22 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council votes to take action to help save the bees

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 11/24/2016 - 12:21

Members of Cornwall Council have today (22 November) supported an action plan to help save the bees. 

Cornwall Council cabinet member for planning Edwina Hannaford has championed support for the preparation and implementation of a Pollinators Action Plan and for a motion which will see allegedly harmful pesticides like neonicotinoids no longer routinely used on Council owned or managed land.

Members have agreed to support Edwina’s motion and have today also called on the Government to fund extensive research into the hazards of glyphosate and neonicotinoids on human health and the environment. In addition, the Council will explore other ways in which to enhance and protect the habitats of bees and other pollinators.

Edwina explains: “Bees are vital to our ecosystem and we must do all we can to halt their decline and to protect them and their habitats.  My concerns are obviously shared by many others judging by the petition from Friends of the Earth that I accepted earlier today. 

I’m delighted that the Council has taken the concerns of so many on board and taken this opportunity to agree to produce a pollinator action plan.  This could include measures such as protecting habitats via the planning process as well as to ensure that new developments provide for bees and other pollinators; establishing wildflower meadows in areas such as parks;  planting bee friendly plants and trees such as  apple, cherry and hawthorn on Council land, and using road verges to encourage the growth of spring and summer flowers. 

I’m delighted that we have today also agreed that neonicotinoids will no longer be used on land owned or managed by the Council including parks, gardens and highway verges. Further work will be undertaken on progressing the potential to stop the use of glyphosphates once the budget becomes available to facilitate this move.”

Work will also be undertaken towards achieving a reduction in the use of neonicotinoids and glyphosphates on County Farms through a detailed and ongoing review of good practice and evidence, and engaging with the farming sector and its representatives.

Story posted: 22 November 2016

Categories: Cornwall