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Free car parking in Bodmin to help town during construction of ‘Building a Better Bodmin’

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 08/24/2016 - 15:25

Visitors and shoppers to Bodmin will be able to park for free in several town centre car parks from Monday 12 September.

Cornwall Council and Bodmin Town Council have offered the concession to help encourage people to visit the town centre during construction of Building a Better Bodmin.

Made up of 12 separate schemes, Building a Better Bodmin is a series of highway improvements to regenerate the town centre, improve traffic flows and safety for people walking and cycling and connecting Bodmin with the Camel Trail and cycle hubs at Lanhydrock and Cardinham Woods.

Construction of the most significant section of works - at the area of Dennison Road, Church Square and Turf Street - will begin in September. 

Due to the nature of the works, which includes widening pavements, narrowing carriageways, improving the leat drainage system and laying new surfacing, roads around the town centre will be closed at times during construction.

The move to offer car parking concessions follows discussions with local business owners and reflects the Council's wish to promote the message that Bodmin is open for business during the construction of the scheme.

The free car parking applies from Monday 12 September in the following car parks:

  • Fore Street - (Short Stay) 3 hours free; (Long Stay) all day
  • Priory Road - (Short Stay - the tiered section) 3 hours free; (Long Stay - by the Football Club) all day
  • Dennison Road - 3 hours free

Reimbursement will be offered to people who have already bought annual car park permits for these car parks.

Councillor Lance Kennedy, the Mayor of Bodmin, said: "Bodmin is looking at a difficult year but the opportunities for business, employment and growth cannot be understated. Five tourist attractions, more than any other town, multi million pound business investments already under consideration are the signs of sustainable growth. Now is the time to plan for the future, prepare for the opportunities and reaffirm the towns growing stature."

Councillor Steve Rogerson, Cornwall Council local member for Bodmin St Petroc, said: "It is good to see the councils working together both in the short term to support businesses and in the long term to support the whole of Bodmin."

Councillor Ann Kerridge, Cornwall Council local member for Bodmin St Mary's, said: "I'm delighted that Cornwall council and Bodmin town council are working hard together to keep Bodmin open for business."

Councillor Bert Biscoe, Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Transport, said: “Well, the Bodmin omelette is in the pan! How good to see a town which has worked so hard to develop a vision for its future, has built the partnership to deliver it and is now starting about the task.

“This will mean some disruption and change but Cornwall Council and Bodmin Town Council are working together to make sure that the town is open for business through a complex process which promises a better future for a better Bodmin.”

As part of the Building a Better Bodmin scheme, work has begun today to build a new roundabout on the junction of Priory Road and Launceston Road in Bodmin.

As well as the new roundabout, the scheme also includes building pedestrian islands and a Toucan crossing on Priory Road, as well as widening the footpath on the road to create clearly segregated paths for walkers and cyclists.

From today, the section of Launceston Road between Priory Road and the lower side of Bodmin Retail Park (Halfords and Homebase) are closed. Access will be maintained for local businesses and construction will take place during the day.

CORMAC will monitor traffic flows in the area, in particular from the junctions at Cooksland Road and Callywith Road, and will introduce manually controlled traffic lights if there is too much congestion in the area.

Read more about the Building a Better Bodmin scheme.

Story posted 08 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Free tours of former Redruth Brewery

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 12:48

The Archives and Cornish Studies Service are offering free tours of the former Redruth Brewery site to coincide with the national Heritage Open Days scheme and Redruth’s International Mining and Pasty Festival.

Visitors will have the opportunity to see the progress that has been made on the site so far, and hear more about plans for the future. The site will be home to Kresen Kernow, Cornwall’s new archive centre, which is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and Cornwall Council and is due to open in 2018.

The free tours will take place on Friday 09 September and Saturday 10 September at 10am, 11am, 1pm and 2pm. Pre-booking is essential as space is limited, and tours are expected to book up fast, so don’t miss out!

Chloe Phillips, Learning Lead for the Service, said: “We’re delighted to be able to offer access to the site once again. Visitors can see just how much has been achieved on site, and hear what the next steps are. There will also be an activity sheet for kids, so feel free to bring them along!”

For more information, or to book your place, call the Cornwall Record Office on 01872 323 127. You can find out more about the project by visiting www.cornwall.gov.uk/kresenkernow or searching for Kresen Kernow on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Story posted 23 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Policing and Local Devolution Fund on the agenda for the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 11:18

Residents of the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel area are invited to the September meeting of the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel, items on the agenda include the Police and Crime Plan, local policing and the Local Devolution Fund.

All are invited to attend the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel meeting which takes place on Wednesday 7 September between 6pm and 7.45pm at Cury Village Hall, Helston.

Lisa Vango, Strategy and Planning Manager for the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner, will be attending the panel to talk about the consultation on the Police and Crime Plan.  The plan sets out the strategic direction for policing and community safety in Devon and Cornwall and the related spending priorities.

Ian Thompson, Police Inspector for Helston and Falmouth, will also be attending the panel to provide an update on local policing priorities. Inspector Thompson will be attending all Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel meetings from September onwards to discuss local strategic policing and to help provide practical resolutions to local issues.

In addition the panel will consider proposals for allocating its share of Cornwall Council’s Local Devolution Fund.  The fund can be used to help local councils and organisations take on the running of services and property in the network area.

Cornwall Councillor Carolyn Rule, Chair of Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel said: “I would like to extend a very warm welcome to everyone to come along to this meeting of the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel, there is a stimulating agenda planned that we need your input on. We are delighted to welcome a representative of the new Police and Crime Commissioner to ask our views on their plans going forward. We are also pleased, and offer a very warm welcome to, our local Police Inspector, Ian Thompson, so come along and meet him also. The third item on the agenda is to discuss plans that have been submitted from our communities as suggested ways of using the Local Devolution Fund monies.

This is your opportunity to meet with your parish and town councillors and Cornwall Councillors in a relaxed and friendly setting and have your views heard. I look forward to welcoming you on the night.”

Ian Thompson, Police Inspector for Helston and Falmouth, said: “I’m pleased that either myself or a representative will be regularly attending the Community Network Meetings as it’s important that the local police have meaningful contact with council representatives and the wider community so that specific policing issues concerning communities can be tackled.  It is also an opportunity for me to promote the Police Force’s mission and priorities, translating those into how the Police in Falmouth & Helston are working to achieve them.”

The Helston and South Kerrier Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local community and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and other agencies including the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The panel comprises all seven Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives from the 18 parishes in the Helston and South Kerrier Community Network - Breage, Crowan, Cury, Germoe, Grade-Ruan, Gunwalloe, Gweek, Helston, Landewednack, Manaccan, Mawgan-in-Meneage, Mullion, Porthleven, Sithney, St. Anthony-in-Meneage, St. Keverne, St. Martin-in-Meneage and Wendron. 

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Community Network pages

Story posted 23 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

New study shows impact of 12,000 years of sea level rises on Isles of Scilly

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 09:01

The Lyonesse Project, a study of the impact of sea level rise on the Isles of Scilly over the past 12,000 years, has been formally published by Cornwall Council with funding from Historic England - marking the culmination of seven years of work.

Popularly associated with the legendary lost land of Lyonesse, the Isles of Scilly were one large island 9,000 years ago.  Lyonesse, said to have extended westwards from Land’s End to the Isles of Scilly, was reported to had 'fair-sized towns and 140 churches' before being engulfed by the sea.  Since the mid-eighteenth century stone walls and other archaeological remains have been identified below high water in Scilly, the result of low-lying land being submerged by the gradual rise in sea-level.

The timing and nature of the changing land areas and the separation of the individual islands has, however, been the subject of much conjecture and debate and research including that by the late Professor Charles Thomas whose classic book ‘Exploration of a Drowned Landscape’ first stimulated serious discussion.

The Lyonesse Project was commissioned by Historic England following the discovery of a submerged forest in St. Mary’s Road by local diver Todd Stevens. The Project was carried out between 2009 and 2013 by the Cornwall Archaeological Unit, part of Cornwall Council, with a team of experts from Aberystwyth, Cardiff, Exeter, Plymouth, Oxford and Glasgow Universities and Historic England’s Scientific Dating Team. Volunteers and local experts from the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Maritime Archaeological Society and the Islands Maritime Archaeology Group were also involved.

The aim of the project was to reconstruct the evolution of the physical environment of Scilly during the Holocene (11,700 cal BP to present), investigate the progressive occupation of this changing coastal landscape by early peoples, explore past and present climate change and sea-level rise and develop geophysical techniques for mapping submerged palaeolandscapes. The team also aimed to improve management, promote better understanding of the islands' historic environment and encourage local community engagement with the historic environment.

Analysis of samples of peat and pollen recovered from a range of sites during the project, including beaches and the submerged forest, have provided a unique insight into the development of the landscape through the Holocene epoch, set against the backdrop of changing sea levels.

“The new data shows that the 500-year period between 2500 and 2000 BC saw the most rapid loss of land at any time in the history of Scilly — equivalent to losing two-thirds of the entire modern area of the islands“ said Charlie Johns, Archaeology Projects Officer, Cornwall Archaeological Unit.

“After this the rate of change slowed significantly so that by circa 1500 BC the pattern of islands was approaching that of today, but with the dramatic difference of a vast intertidal area of saltmarsh in what is now the islands’ inner lagoon.

“Much of this would have remained useful land, especially for grazing animal stock and would have been passable with ease almost all of the time. It was not until there was an open channel north of St Mary’s during most states of the tide that the saltmarsh began to erode rapidly: radiocarbon dates suggest this is likely to have occurred in the early medieval period, after 600-670 AD“ he added.

Daniel Ratcliffe, Inspector of Ancient Monuments for Historic England in the South West, said “Historic England is very pleased to have funded this ground breaking research.  Our understanding of the internationally important archaeological heritage of Scilly, is fundamentally bound up in our understanding of environmental change. This new cutting edge research will be instrumental in refining our knowledge of how Scilly’s populations have responded to the ever present challenges of living within an evolving coastline throughout history.”

The Lyonesse Project: a study of the historic coastal and marine environment of the Isles of Scilly  by Dan J. Charman, Charles Johns, Kevin Camidge, Peter Marshall, Steve Mills, Jacqui Mulville, Helen M. Roberts and Todd Stevens was published by Cornwall Council at the end of July.

More information is available on the Cornwall Archaeological Unit website

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council supporting Cornwall Pride this Saturday

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 08/22/2016 - 14:43

Cornwall Council is supporting this year’s Cornwall Pride event in Truro on Saturday 27 August 2016 and will be proudly flying the rainbow flag at New County Hall leading up to and through the Pride weekend.

Cornwall Pride celebrates the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities of Cornwall in a fun and inclusive event. Cornwall Council will be there to promote its services and opportunities, and show its support for the communities it serves.  Representatives from the Council will join the parade, which will be opened by Cllr Rob Nolan, Mayor of Truro and starting at 11am from Lemon Quay, and will be in Victoria Gardens, where revellers will gather after the parade.

The Council will also be promoting the services and support on offer from its Registration Service for those who may be planning a marriage or civil ceremony in Cornwall. The registration service can provide information about venues licensed to host a civil ceremony and offer support for that special day.

The Council’s Corporate Equality and Diversity Team will be advising people on how to report hate crime incidents and encouraging people to sig the ‘We Say No to Hate Crime’ pledge.

Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service will be there to talk about careers within the service; our key message for recruitment is ‘If you’re out, then we want you in’. A number of our community safety team will be in attendance with some of their emergency vehicles as well as being on hand to give advice and guidance on community safety, members and our Anti-Social Behaviour Team will be there to discuss how to report hate related incidents as well as supporting the ‘We say no to hate’ campaign.

Once again we are proud to have one of our fire engines in the parade demonstrating our commitment to supporting diversity and improving inclusion within Cornwall.

Other services represented will be Fostering and Adoption and Adult Education.

Representatives from the Safer Cornwall Partnership which includes Cornwall Council and Devon and Cornwall Police, will be talking about their ongoing ‘what will your drink cost?’ campaign. The campaign delivers educational and preventive messages on the risks of drinking too much alcohol, and where to find help to cut down.

Cllr John Pollard, Leader of Cornwall Council with responsibility for equality and diversity said “We endeavour to make Cornwall fully inclusive by setting an example in all we do.  By participating in the Pride event we intend to show our intent and ability to support the whole community and the range of services we offer. Having attended Pride, it is also great fun!”

Hannah Toms, Vice Chair of Cornwall Pride said  “We are so pleased that the council continue to support our event, we particular want to thank them for flying the rainbow flag outside County Hall, this is an important visual symbol of Cornwall Council's support for the LGBT community.”

Story posted: 22 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Working together brings greater training opportunities to the people of Cornwall

Cornwall Council News feed - Mon, 08/22/2016 - 12:27

Cornwall Housing and Cornwall Council’s Adult Education Team are working together to make it easier for Council tenants to access free courses and other training opportunities.

The Tenant Engagement Team from Cornwall Housing is already working in the community by taking their ‘HOME’ project to customers’ homes or holding pop up road shows to help tenants access Health and Wellbeing services; on-line access; money management support and employment, training and motivational workshops. As a result of this partnership, the services offered by Cornwall Council’s Adult Education Team will now also be taken into the heart of the community alongside Cornwall Housing’s Tenant Engagement Team.

Cornwall Council’s Adult Education has a huge amount of training courses on offer. People can take free maths and English courses from beginners to GCSE, there are courses on running a business, there are also training courses to become a beautician.

Morwenna Vernon, Assistant Head of Adult Education said: “We work with our students to create what is almost a tailor made package. We can offer the courses and exams that they need to perhaps help them take the next steps into training or employment.

“We are excited to be working in such close partnership with Cornwall Housing.  Every year we hold an Adult Learner Awards ceremony which recognises those who have had to overcome barriers to learn and we hope that next year we can have a Cornwall Housing Award.”

Cornwall Housing Tenant Engagement Manager, Tania Horrocks said: “This is a great opportunity for our Council tenants who may have been thinking about taking the next steps to learning something new or achieving new skills to gain employment, it has now never been easier.

“Sometimes, people can feel quite intimidated and unsure in a classroom setting which can then be a barrier to gaining new qualifications. With the support that Adult Education provides, this barrier can be overcome and we are delighted to be in a position to help tenants access this service.”

For more information on what courses are available contact Adult Education on 0300 1231 117 or email aecentral@cornwall.gov.uk  or Cornwall Housing Tenant Engagement Manager on 0300 1234 161 or email info@cornwallhousing.org.uk.

Story posted 22 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall stages special Acorn service to remember those who have died from substance misuse

Cornwall Council News feed - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 12:38

Updated 19 August 2016.  This event has been postponed due to forecast bad weather.  A new date will be confirmed as soon as possible.

Agencies in Cornwall are joining together to stage a special Acorn Service during this year’s Addaction Hope Festival at Truro’s Boscawen Park on Saturday, 20 August to remember people who have died from substance misuse.

The Remembrance service, which is being supported by Cornwall Council, Truro City Council, Cornwall Drug and Alcohol Action Team, Addaction, and Bosence Drug and Alcohol treatment service, will begin at 2 pm. The 40 minute service will include music from service users, substance misuse treatment workers, personal reflections and a tailored service which seeks to poignantly touch on some of the complex issues surrounding these deaths.

“The aim of the service is to not only to remember those that have died from substance misuse, but also those family, loved ones and friends who mourn these deaths and have often been through a complex and emotional journey” said Sid Willett, the Drug Related Death Prevention Co-ordinator for the Cornwall Drug and Alcohol Action Team.

This will be the third consecutive year the Acorn Service has been held in Cornwall after two very well attended previous  services at Truro Cathedral

Among those taking part in the service are Rob and Claudia Menzies who lost their daughter over the New Year of 2015. They will reflect on her life in ‘Remembering Miranda’.

Victoria, a keyworker with Bosence, will also be reflecting during the service.  “Some lives are lost, many lives are recovered“ she said.  “We will celebrate every one”.

2015 saw 24 deaths in Cornwall directly attributable to drug use. This figure is based on a specific definition of what a drug related death is. Alcohol and drugs that are not contained within that definition add to this annual tally.

’I attend many inquests as part of my work and meet people who have lost family members and loved ones” said Sid Willett,  “As you would expect they display a wide range of emotions- these emotions can be unique to these deaths due to the complex issues at play with substance use. It is important that we remember, reflect, review and seek to prevent future deaths’.

‘This is a great opportunity this year to combine with Addactions’ Hope Festival and further increase awareness of this important issue’.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Addaction Hope festival invites public to help celebrate those coming through adversity

Cornwall Council News feed - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 12:36

Updated 19 August 2016.  This event has been postponed due to forecast bad weather.  A new date will be confirmed as soon as possible.

Addaction community recovery champions and volunteers are organising a special festival of Hope in Truro’s Boscawen Park between noon and 5pm on Saturday, 20 August.  

The festival, which will be formally opened by the Mayor of Truro Rob Nolan, offers a wide range of activities for all the family, including music performance by bands Mudsticks and Addaction’s Hopefully Synchronised , circus skills workshops and hair braiding and a special performance of children’s story the Ugly Duckling.

“The aim of the festival is to celebrate how people come through adversity and treatment and flourish “said Tracy Smith, Addaction’s Community Engagement Lead. “There is hope in recovery and we want to increase awareness among members of the public and show there is hope for anyone who struggles with substance misuse.“ 

“Entry to the festival is free and we want as many people as possible to come along and enjoy the afternoon.”

As well as the circus skills workshops and hair up dos and braiding, there will also be face painting and a bouncy castle, and a range of stalls, including food and home-made cakes. There will be short testimonials of Hope by volunteers and staff who have come through the service. The event will finish with a special version of the story of the ‘Ugly Duckling’. 

“The event is substance free and no alcohol will be on sale or will be allowed to be brought in to the festival” said Tracy. 

People are being asked to use the park and ride or park in the car parks around the city and walk down to Boscawen Park. 

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall prepares for severe weather

Cornwall Council News feed - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 08:54

With Met Office forecasts of strong winds and heavy rain due to affect Cornwall over the coming days, Cornwall Council is warning residents and visitors to be prepared and take precautions where necessary after the recent dry spell.

The latest information from the MET Office and the Environment Agency is for rain on Friday, with strengthening winds overnight bringing gusting of 40-50 miles per hour inland and up to 60 miles per hour along exposed coasts throughout Cornwall on Saturday. This could lead to some fallen trees, with the potential for overturned vehicles, with caravans and high sided vehicles at particular risk, and damage to temporary structures such as tents and marquees. There could also be spray overtopping at exposed coastal locations.

As a result the Met office has issued a Yellow Weather warning for high winds and the public are advised to check for any Environment Agency Flood Warnings over the coming weekend especially for the coast.

Officers from Cornwall Council’s Highways, Environment, Fire and Rescue and Emergency Management services will be monitoring the situation closely and are on standby to deal with any problems.

Agencies are asking people living in areas which are prone to flooding especially along the coast to make sure they take the necessary precautions. They are also advising people to take care when driving, particularly those driving high sided vehicles or towing caravans as the roads will inevitably be busy.

They are also advising people to put away any garden furniture and ensure that tents, trampolines, bouncy castles, gazebos or marquees are secure. People organising community events over the weekend are advised to undertake their own risk assessments.

Members of the public are also being asked to take care when walking along the coast path or along piers and promenades, and by cliff edges during the strong winds, with surfers and small boat owners advised to check advice from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency on whether to go into the water. Surfers and swimmers are advised to adhere to the flags at amenity beaches.

As neither the Council nor the Environment Agency has a statutory duty to provide sandbags, anyone whose property is prone to flooding should ensure they have a supply of sandbags ready to protect their home or business should they need to.  Local communities are also encouraged to check with vulnerable neighbours in case they need help with obtaining flood protection materials. Residents are also advised to check that their drains are clear of leaves and blockages.

Sandbags can be obtained from builders merchants, DIY and hardware stores. Anyone who is unsure if their property is at risk can check on the environment agency website www.gov.uk/flood or call the floodline on 0345 988 1188.

Story posted: 19 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Council congratulates young people in Cornwall on A level success

Cornwall Council News feed - Thu, 08/18/2016 - 12:54

With thousands of youngsters in Cornwall receiving their A level exam results today, Andrew Wallis, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Children and Young People, said that their achievements are a tribute to the hard work and commitment of students, schools and colleges and to the support provided by parents and carers.

“This is a very important day for all these young people and I would like to congratulate everyone on their achievements and wish them luck in whatever path they take” he said. 

Jane Black, the Council’s Head of Service for Learning and Achievement, has also welcomed the success of Cornish students. “Hopefully everyone has got the grades they need to go onto the next stage, whether that is to higher education or to the world of work” she said. “ However, if you have not done as well as you had hoped, then please don’t panic as there is a huge amount of support available from schools and colleges.”

 “Although we know there are more university places available this year and encourage students to take advantage of this opportunity, we know that university may not be the right option for everyone. More young people are now choosing apprenticeships which are an equally attractive alternative to higher education. Traineeships are also available to provide young people with the necessary skills and experience to access apprenticeships and wider employment opportunities.

“If you are unsure what to do next, you can contact the National Careers Service which offers free and impartial advice and access to a range of online tools, including skills tests, course search, job search advice and personalised help from careers advisers.“

The National Careers Service can be contacted in confidence by telephone on a dedicated careers helpline 0800 100 900, via web chat and email by searching online for the National Careers Service.

“The Council is committed to raising aspirations among all our young people” added Jane Black.  “We are continuing to work with all schools, settings and partners in Cornwall to ensure that students aspire to be the very best they can be, in their learning journey from Early Years to adulthood.”

Officers from the Local Authority will now be working with Headteachers and Governors to analyse both the A levels results and this year’s GCSE results, due to be released next week.  

“It is important for the future of both our young people and for the future of Cornwall that all students have access to the highest possible quality of education” said Trevor Doughty, the Council’s Corporate Director for Children, Schools and Families.  “While the majority of our schools are achieving high standards, we need to ensure that all are enabling students to achieve the maximum progress possible.

Story posted: 18 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Cornwall Council welcomes Eisteddfod Proclamation and calls on new Secretary of State to provide funding for Cornish language

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 11:47

Cornwall Council has welcomed a Proclamation from the Welsh National Eisteddfod condemning the Government’s decision to cut funding for the Cornish language.

The formal Proclamation on indigenous languages in Britain and Ireland follows a discussion on language issues by groups from Wales, Cornwall, the Isle of Man, the North of Ireland and Scotland during last week’s National Eisteddfod held in Abergavenny.

The joint Proclamation declares that these language communities will work together to ensure a fair future for their languages under the new regime that will follow the ‘Brexit’ result of the referendum stating: “We shall use all peaceful means within our capacity to withstand... injustice and to secure financial, political and cultural fairness for our language communities.”

All the groups then condemn the recent decision to completely cut financial support for the Cornish language.

Welcoming the Proclamation Julian German, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Culture and Economy , said “We recognise the intrinsic, as well as social and economic, value of the Cornish language and are very grateful for this clear message of support from other indigenous language groups.

“We were very disappointed that the last Government failed to carry out its responsibility to support the Cornish language but are hopeful that the new Secretary of State will resolve this situation and financial support will soon be forthcoming.

“We are writing to the Secretary of State to ask him to reconsider the decision not to provide funding for Cornwall’s programme to protect and develop the Cornish language – Kernewek”.

The Council originally submitted a bid for a 5 year funding deal to support the language in November 2015 but was informed by the Minister for Local Growth and the Northern Powerhouse on 20 April that the bid to put the language onto a stable footing had been rejected.

The decision caused a great deal of anger and concern in Cornwall and elsewhere in the UK, with a petition calling for funding for the Cornish language to be reinstated gaining the support over 10,000 people.  The Council then wrote to the Minister on 6 May asking for either a reconsideration of the decision or a meeting to discuss support for the language but has not received a response to this request. 

“Kernewek is one of Britain’s indigenous languages and there is growing demand for its use” said Julian German.  “The Leader of the Council was told in April that it was our responsibility to fund the Cornish language – but it is the UK Government, and not Cornwall Council, that is the signatory to the European Charter for Regional and Minority Languages and the Framework Convention for National Minorities. At this stage it is not clear how the Government intends to meet its obligations under these agreements with regard to Cornish. 

“Our funding bid is for a very small amount compared to the amount being given to support investment in the UK’s other Celtic languages and sets out a clear programme for ensuring that the Cornish language could thrive and be a part of modern Britain.  In the light of the petition and other calls in support of the language, we are asking the Government to reconsider its previous funding decision.“

Story posted: 17 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Trading Standards officers advise charity shops over second hand product legislation and electrical products safety standards

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 11:04

Cornwall Trading Standards has been giving advice to charity shops across Cornwall about how to ensure that the products they sell are safe and comply with safety regulations after 1 in 10 electrical items on sale in charity outlets failed to meet safety standards.

All second-hand good sellers are responsible for ensuring they meet legal safety requirements and may also be liable to pay compensation if they sell consumers unsafe goods which cause injury or damage.

The majority of products seized during the visits by Trading Standards officers were as a result of faulty or damaged wiring and unsafe plugs. This included 2-pin continental plugs attached to products that are not suitable for UK standard voltage. These types of plugs can also be easily inserted upside down in UK sockets, resulting in the live and neutral terminals connecting the wrong way, increasing the risk of electrocution.

Research shows that imported counterfeit fuses are being increasingly used in appliances. Trading Standards officers are advising members of the public to hold a fuse and feel its weight before trusting a fuse and to ask themselves if it feels full of sand that makes it work or empty? They are also advising people to check that the ends cannot easily be removed and that it carries a kite mark and state BS1362 which confirms testing to the British Safety Standard. Anyone who is not sure should ask a qualified electrician to carry out a safety check or component replacement.

“It is crucial that all local residents are aware of the importance of checking the safety of second hand purchases“ said Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards. “Always buy from reputable sources and keep your receipt safe”.

During the visits to charity shops Trading Standards also found 100% of cosmetics were incorrectly labelled. Where cosmetics have been opened and used there is no way to tell if these donated goods are safe and within best before end dates so officers are advising consumers to avoid these products.

The UK has statutory hallmarking which means that every item sold as precious metal, ie gold, silver, platinum or palladium, must have been tested and hallmarked by an independent third-party Assay Office to guarantee that the precious metal is of the fineness stated.

On visits 1 in 4 charity shops were selling precious metals without displaying the compulsory hallmarking notice. This explains the approved hallmarks to ensure consumers benefit from the protection it offers them at the point of sale.

A third of local charity retailers were also not complying with the Consumer Rights Act 2015 refusing refunds on second hand goods. Under the legislation consumers still have rights when purchasing second hand goods or clearance items. They cannot be ‘sold as seen’ which restricts consumer rights.

Councillor Geoff Brown adds: “Cornwall Trading Standards work hard all year to protect local consumers from risk”.

If you think you may be using faulty or unsafe products please stop and return them to where they were purchased. Please contact Cornwall Trading Standards or follow them on social media for product safety information.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Trading Standards officers advise charity shops over second hand product legislation after 1 in 10 electrical products fail to meet safety standards

Cornwall Council News feed - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 10:58

Cornwall Trading Standards has been giving advice to charity shops across Cornwall about how to ensure that the products they sell are safe and comply with safety regulations after 1 in 10 electrical items on sale in charity outlets failed to meet safety standards.

All second-hand good sellers are responsible for ensuring they meet legal safety requirements and may also be liable to pay compensation if they sell consumers unsafe goods which cause injury or damage.

The majority of products seized during the visits by Trading Standards officers were as a result of faulty or damaged wiring and unsafe plugs. This included 2-pin continental plugs attached to products that are not suitable for UK standard voltage. These types of plugs can also be easily inserted upside down in UK sockets, resulting in the live and neutral terminals connecting the wrong way, increasing the risk of electrocution.

Research shows that imported counterfeit fuses are being increasingly used in appliances. Trading Standards officers are advising members of the public to hold a fuse and feel its weight before trusting a fuse and to ask themselves if it feels full of sand that makes it work or empty? They are also advising people to check that the ends cannot easily be removed and that it carries a kite mark and state BS1362 which confirms testing to the British Safety Standard. Anyone who is not sure should ask a qualified electrician to carry out a safety check or component replacement.

“It is crucial that all local residents are aware of the importance of checking the safety of second hand purchases“ said Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards. “Always buy from reputable sources and keep your receipt safe”.

During the visits to charity shops Trading Standards also found 100% of cosmetics were incorrectly labelled. Where cosmetics have been opened and used there is no way to tell if these donated goods are safe and within best before end dates so officers are advising consumers to avoid these products.

The UK has statutory hallmarking which means that every item sold as precious metal, ie gold, silver, platinum or palladium, must have been tested and hallmarked by an independent third-party Assay Office to guarantee that the precious metal is of the fineness stated.

On visits 1 in 4 charity shops were selling precious metals without displaying the compulsory hallmarking notice. This explains the approved hallmarks to ensure consumers benefit from the protection it offers them at the point of sale.

A third of local charity retailers were also not complying with the Consumer Rights Act 2015 refusing refunds on second hand goods. Under the legislation consumers still have rights when purchasing second hand goods or clearance items. They cannot be ‘sold as seen’ which restricts consumer rights.

Councillor Geoff Brown adds: “Cornwall Trading Standards work hard all year to protect local consumers from risk”.

If you think you may be using faulty or unsafe products please stop and return them to where they were purchased. Please contact Cornwall Trading Standards or follow them on social media for product safety information.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Residents in Cornwall are urged to register now to vote in next year’s local government elections

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 14:12

Cornwall Council is calling on residents to register to vote now to make sure they can have their say and vote in the local council elections in May 2017.

The Council is required to produce a new and accurate list of voters each year which then stays in force for the following twelve months.

On Friday 19 August, over 264,000 electoral household enquiry forms will be posted to homes across Cornwall, signalling the start of this year’s annual canvass. 

Residents can use a dedicated internet, freephone or SMS text response services to provide details of any changes or, alternatively, can return forms by post.

Information supplied by residents will then be used to update the new electoral register which will be published on 1 December 2016. This register will contain the names and addresses of people who are eligible to vote in elections including the Cornwall Council (Unitary) and the town and parish elections on 4 May 2017.

The Council’s electoral services team hope as many people as possible will provide the information without the need for further reminders to help save council taxpayers money. However in October canvassers will visit any households who have still not responded to deliver reminders and help people fill out their forms.

“People are required by law to provide the information which is asked for in the forms“ said Adam Paynter, the Council’s Cabinet Member for Resources. “While most people respond quickly, we always have a number who do not return their forms. If people look out for the forms and respond promptly then they can help to make savings which can go towards other essential services”.

Anyone does not receive a form is asked to contact the Council’s electoral registration team on 0300 123 1115.

Further information is available from the Council’s website

Story posted: 16 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Arts Council England fund new piece of music to celebrate historic sounds of King Edward Mine

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 13:04

King Edward Mine has received funding to commission acclaimed composer, musician and conductor Gareth Churcher to create a new piece of music to capture the sounds of the historic mill machinery at the site. 

Arts Council England and FEAST are contributing over £5,000 towards the exciting new music commission which will be performed by St Keverne Brass Band and Eight in a Bar male voice choir during the site’s Celebratory Weekend in 2017. Cornwall Music Service Trust will also be delivering a series of workshops with the local primary schools who will be contributing to the final composition and performance.

The first ever performance of the new commission will take place during the Celebratory Weekend between 31 April and 1 May 2017 as part of a programme of free events to celebrate the completion of the museum’s redevelopment.

The redevelopment project, which has been funded by Cornwall Council, the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Architectural Heritage Fund’s Challenge Fund for Historic Buildings at Risk and other funders, began in 2011 and has included the conservation of sixteen Grade II* listed buildings over two phases of work. 

The first phase, completed in 2015, was the refurbishment of two derelict buildings as workspaces for local businesses; and the second phase will see the refurbishment of a further two buildings as a new café and exhibition space, the conservation of the remaining buildings and the launch of a new programme of community events and activities in 2017.

King Edward Mine is the oldest, best preserved mine site in the Cornish Mining World Heritage Site and has the most complete collection of early 20th century tin dressing plant in the world, much of which has been brought back into working order by volunteers and is run every day for visitors. The towering Californian Stamps, around which the mill was built, were brought back to King Edward Mine from the Paris Exposition of 1900.  They are now operated only once a year, and for only a few minutes, at the site’s annual Open Day. 

The huge sound that the Stamps produce creates a driving rhythm that shakes the whole Mill as they crush the mineral ore. The mining areas of Cornwall were once filled with the tumultuous noise of these huge stamping machines – a mining landscape that is now silent.  Gareth Churcher has the challenge of capturing this heritage within a new composition, working with St Keverne Brass Band and Eight in a Bar male voice choir. 

“I am extremely excited to be involved in this collaboration that will invoke progressive work for disciplines of music making that are steeped in culture and heritage” said Gareth.

The new composition will fit the remit of a ‘test piece’ for bands and choirs, meaning that the piece will become part of the repertoire and performed long after the inaugural performance at King Edward Mine, not just locally by nationally.  The performance will also be recorded and made available via King Edward Mine’s website and the World Heritage Site’s website.

In preparation for the event, Cornwall Music Service Trust will work closely with Troon Primary School to deliver 10 workshops, teaching the children about both musical composition and Cornwall’s industrial heritage with the ambition to excite young people about contemporary music-making.

"I am really pleased this commission is taking place; bringing together one of our most important World Heritage sites and our music and singing culture” said Julian German, Cornwall Council’s Cabinet Member for Economy and Culture.  “I can't wait to hear the piece performed at the celebratory weekend."

Kevin Baker, Chair of King Edward Mine Ltd. said: “It is fantastic news that Arts Council England and FEAST are supporting this new composition and the work with the local primary school to create what will be an inspirational new piece of music drawing on the legacy of our musical and industrial heritage and interpreting this for contemporary audiences.  The performance of this work will be a highlight of our Celebratory Weekend next year, building on our very successful annual free Open Day.”

Rose Barnecut, Director of FEAST, said: “FEAST is delighted to be supporting such an innovative project which brings together Cornish mining history, traditional Cornish culture and contemporary musical composition – the best of the old with the best of the new.”

Story posted: 16 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Trading Standards officers advise charity shops over second hand product legislation after 1 in 10 electrical products fail to meet safety standards

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 11:10

Cornwall Trading Standards has been giving advice to charity shops across Cornwall about how to ensure that the products they sell are safe and comply with safety regulations after 1 in 10 electrical items on sale in charity outlets failed to meet safety standards.

All second-hand good sellers are responsible for ensuring they meet legal safety requirements and may also be liable to pay compensation if they sell consumers unsafe goods which cause injury or damage.

The majority of products seized during the visits by Trading Standards officers were as a result of faulty or damaged wiring and unsafe plugs. This included 2-pin continental plugs attached to products that are not suitable for UK standard voltage. These types of plugs can also be easily inserted upside down in UK sockets, resulting in the live and neutral terminals connecting the wrong way, increasing the risk of electrocution.

Research shows that imported counterfeit fuses are being increasingly used in appliances. Trading Standards officers are advising members of the public to hold a fuse and feel its weight before trusting a fuse and to ask themselves if it feels full of sand that makes it work or empty? They are also advising people to check that the ends cannot easily be removed and that it carries a kite mark and state BS1362 which confirms testing to the British Safety Standard. Anyone who is not sure should ask a qualified electrician to carry out a safety check or component replacement.

“It is crucial that all local residents are aware of the importance of checking the safety of second hand purchases“ said Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards. “Always buy from reputable sources and keep your receipt safe”.

During the visits to charity shops Trading Standards also found 100% of cosmetics were incorrectly labelled. Where cosmetics have been opened and used there is no way to tell if these donated goods are safe and within best before end dates so officers are advising consumers to avoid these products.

The UK has statutory hallmarking which means that every item sold as precious metal, ie gold, silver, platinum or palladium, must have been tested and hallmarked by an independent third-party Assay Office to guarantee that the precious metal is of the fineness stated.

On visits 1 in 4 charity shops were selling precious metals without displaying the compulsory hallmarking notice. This explains the approved hallmarks to ensure consumers benefit from the protection it offers them at the point of sale.

A third of local charity retailers were also not complying with the Consumer Rights Act 2015 refusing refunds on second hand goods. Under the legislation consumers still have rights when purchasing second hand goods or clearance items. They cannot be ‘sold as seen’ which restricts consumer rights.

Councillor Geoff Brown adds: “Cornwall Trading Standards work hard all year to protect local consumers from risk”.

If you think you may be using faulty or unsafe products please stop and return them to where they were purchased. Please contact Cornwall Trading Standards or follow them on social media for product safety information.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Trading Standards officers advise charity shops over second hand product legislation after 1 in 10 electrical products fail to meet safety standards

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 11:10

Cornwall Trading Standards has been giving advice to charity shops across Cornwall about how to ensure that the products they sell are safe and comply with safety regulations after 1 in 10 electrical items on sale in charity outlets failed to meet safety standards.

All second-hand good sellers are responsible for ensuring they meet legal safety requirements and may also be liable to pay compensation if they sell consumers unsafe goods which cause injury or damage.

The majority of products seized during the visits by Trading Standards officers were as a result of faulty or damaged wiring and unsafe plugs. This included 2-pin continental plugs attached to products that are not suitable for UK standard voltage. These types of plugs can also be easily inserted upside down in UK sockets, resulting in the live and neutral terminals connecting the wrong way, increasing the risk of electrocution.

Research shows that imported counterfeit fuses are being increasingly used in appliances. Trading Standards officers are advising members of the public to hold a fuse and feel its weight before trusting a fuse and to ask themselves if it feels full of sand that makes it work or empty? They are also advising people to check that the ends cannot easily be removed and that it carries a kite mark and state BS1362 which confirms testing to the British Safety Standard. Anyone who is not sure should ask a qualified electrician to carry out a safety check or component replacement.

“It is crucial that all local residents are aware of the importance of checking the safety of second hand purchases“ said Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards. “Always buy from reputable sources and keep your receipt safe”.

During the visits to charity shops Trading Standards also found 100% of cosmetics were incorrectly labelled. Where cosmetics have been opened and used there is no way to tell if these donated goods are safe and within best before end dates so officers are advising consumers to avoid these products.

The UK has statutory hallmarking which means that every item sold as precious metal, ie gold, silver, platinum or palladium, must have been tested and hallmarked by an independent third-party Assay Office to guarantee that the precious metal is of the fineness stated.

On visits 1 in 4 charity shops were selling precious metals without displaying the compulsory hallmarking notice. This explains the approved hallmarks to ensure consumers benefit from the protection it offers them at the point of sale.

A third of local charity retailers were also not complying with the Consumer Rights Act 2015 refusing refunds on second hand goods. Under the legislation consumers still have rights when purchasing second hand goods or clearance items. They cannot be ‘sold as seen’ which restricts consumer rights.

Councillor Geoff Brown adds: “Cornwall Trading Standards work hard all year to protect local consumers from risk”.

If you think you may be using faulty or unsafe products please stop and return them to where they were purchased. Please contact Cornwall Trading Standards or follow them on social media for product safety information.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Trading Standards officers advise charity shops over second hand product legislation after 1 in 10 electrical products fail to meet safety standards

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 11:10

Cornwall Trading Standards has been giving advice to charity shops across Cornwall about how to ensure that the products they sell are safe and comply with safety regulations after 1 in 10 electrical items on sale in charity outlets failed to meet safety standards.

All second-hand good sellers are responsible for ensuring they meet legal safety requirements and may also be liable to pay compensation if they sell consumers unsafe goods which cause injury or damage.

The majority of products seized during the visits by Trading Standards officers were as a result of faulty or damaged wiring and unsafe plugs. This included 2-pin continental plugs attached to products that are not suitable for UK standard voltage. These types of plugs can also be easily inserted upside down in UK sockets, resulting in the live and neutral terminals connecting the wrong way, increasing the risk of electrocution.

Research shows that imported counterfeit fuses are being increasingly used in appliances. Trading Standards officers are advising members of the public to hold a fuse and feel its weight before trusting a fuse and to ask themselves if it feels full of sand that makes it work or empty? They are also advising people to check that the ends cannot easily be removed and that it carries a kite mark and state BS1362 which confirms testing to the British Safety Standard. Anyone who is not sure should ask a qualified electrician to carry out a safety check or component replacement.

“It is crucial that all local residents are aware of the importance of checking the safety of second hand purchases“ said Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards. “Always buy from reputable sources and keep your receipt safe”.

During the visits to charity shops Trading Standards also found 100% of cosmetics were incorrectly labelled. Where cosmetics have been opened and used there is no way to tell if these donated goods are safe and within best before end dates so officers are advising consumers to avoid these products.

The UK has statutory hallmarking which means that every item sold as precious metal, ie gold, silver, platinum or palladium, must have been tested and hallmarked by an independent third-party Assay Office to guarantee that the precious metal is of the fineness stated.

On visits 1 in 4 charity shops were selling precious metals without displaying the compulsory hallmarking notice. This explains the approved hallmarks to ensure consumers benefit from the protection it offers them at the point of sale.

A third of local charity retailers were also not complying with the Consumer Rights Act 2015 refusing refunds on second hand goods. Under the legislation consumers still have rights when purchasing second hand goods or clearance items. They cannot be ‘sold as seen’ which restricts consumer rights.

Councillor Geoff Brown adds: “Cornwall Trading Standards work hard all year to protect local consumers from risk”.

If you think you may be using faulty or unsafe products please stop and return them to where they were purchased. Please contact Cornwall Trading Standards or follow them on social media for product safety information.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Trading Standards officers advise charity shops over second hand product legislation after 1 in 10 electrical products fail to meet safety standards

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 11:10

Cornwall Trading Standards has been giving advice to charity shops across Cornwall about how to ensure that the products they sell are safe and comply with safety regulations after 1 in 10 electrical items on sale in charity outlets failed to meet safety standards.

All second-hand good sellers are responsible for ensuring they meet legal safety requirements and may also be liable to pay compensation if they sell consumers unsafe goods which cause injury or damage.

The majority of products seized during the visits by Trading Standards officers were as a result of faulty or damaged wiring and unsafe plugs. This included 2-pin continental plugs attached to products that are not suitable for UK standard voltage. These types of plugs can also be easily inserted upside down in UK sockets, resulting in the live and neutral terminals connecting the wrong way, increasing the risk of electrocution.

Research shows that imported counterfeit fuses are being increasingly used in appliances. Trading Standards officers are advising members of the public to hold a fuse and feel its weight before trusting a fuse and to ask themselves if it feels full of sand that makes it work or empty? They are also advising people to check that the ends cannot easily be removed and that it carries a kite mark and state BS1362 which confirms testing to the British Safety Standard. Anyone who is not sure should ask a qualified electrician to carry out a safety check or component replacement.

“It is crucial that all local residents are aware of the importance of checking the safety of second hand purchases“ said Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards. “Always buy from reputable sources and keep your receipt safe”.

During the visits to charity shops Trading Standards also found 100% of cosmetics were incorrectly labelled. Where cosmetics have been opened and used there is no way to tell if these donated goods are safe and within best before end dates so officers are advising consumers to avoid these products.

The UK has statutory hallmarking which means that every item sold as precious metal, ie gold, silver, platinum or palladium, must have been tested and hallmarked by an independent third-party Assay Office to guarantee that the precious metal is of the fineness stated.

On visits 1 in 4 charity shops were selling precious metals without displaying the compulsory hallmarking notice. This explains the approved hallmarks to ensure consumers benefit from the protection it offers them at the point of sale.

A third of local charity retailers were also not complying with the Consumer Rights Act 2015 refusing refunds on second hand goods. Under the legislation consumers still have rights when purchasing second hand goods or clearance items. They cannot be ‘sold as seen’ which restricts consumer rights.

Councillor Geoff Brown adds: “Cornwall Trading Standards work hard all year to protect local consumers from risk”.

If you think you may be using faulty or unsafe products please stop and return them to where they were purchased. Please contact Cornwall Trading Standards or follow them on social media for product safety information.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall

Trading Standards officers advise charity shops over second hand product legislation after 1 in 10 electrical products fail to meet safety standards

Cornwall Council News feed - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 11:10

Cornwall Trading Standards has been giving advice to charity shops across Cornwall about how to ensure that the products they sell are safe and comply with safety regulations after 1 in 10 electrical items on sale in charity outlets failed to meet safety standards.

All second-hand good sellers are responsible for ensuring they meet legal safety requirements and may also be liable to pay compensation if they sell consumers unsafe goods which cause injury or damage.

The majority of products seized during the visits by Trading Standards officers were as a result of faulty or damaged wiring and unsafe plugs. This included 2-pin continental plugs attached to products that are not suitable for UK standard voltage. These types of plugs can also be easily inserted upside down in UK sockets, resulting in the live and neutral terminals connecting the wrong way, increasing the risk of electrocution.

Research shows that imported counterfeit fuses are being increasingly used in appliances. Trading Standards officers are advising members of the public to hold a fuse and feel its weight before trusting a fuse and to ask themselves if it feels full of sand that makes it work or empty? They are also advising people to check that the ends cannot easily be removed and that it carries a kite mark and state BS1362 which confirms testing to the British Safety Standard. Anyone who is not sure should ask a qualified electrician to carry out a safety check or component replacement.

“It is crucial that all local residents are aware of the importance of checking the safety of second hand purchases“ said Andy Burnside, from Cornwall Trading Standards. “Always buy from reputable sources and keep your receipt safe”.

During the visits to charity shops Trading Standards also found 100% of cosmetics were incorrectly labelled. Where cosmetics have been opened and used there is no way to tell if these donated goods are safe and within best before end dates so officers are advising consumers to avoid these products.

The UK has statutory hallmarking which means that every item sold as precious metal, ie gold, silver, platinum or palladium, must have been tested and hallmarked by an independent third-party Assay Office to guarantee that the precious metal is of the fineness stated.

On visits 1 in 4 charity shops were selling precious metals without displaying the compulsory hallmarking notice. This explains the approved hallmarks to ensure consumers benefit from the protection it offers them at the point of sale.

A third of local charity retailers were also not complying with the Consumer Rights Act 2015 refusing refunds on second hand goods. Under the legislation consumers still have rights when purchasing second hand goods or clearance items. They cannot be ‘sold as seen’ which restricts consumer rights.

Councillor Geoff Brown adds: “Cornwall Trading Standards work hard all year to protect local consumers from risk”.

If you think you may be using faulty or unsafe products please stop and return them to where they were purchased. Please contact Cornwall Trading Standards or follow them on social media for product safety information.

Story posted: 15 August 2016

Categories: Cornwall