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Millwall v Bournemouth

BBC London News Feed - 52 min 58 sec ago
Live coverage of Wednesday's Championship game between Millwall and Bournemouth.

European Super League: All six Premier League teams withdraw from competition

Merseyside BBC News Feed - 1 hour 7 min ago
All six Premier League teams involved in the European Super League formally withdraw from the competition.
Categories: Merseyside

European Super League: All six Premier League teams withdraw from competition

BBC Manchester - 1 hour 7 min ago
All six Premier League teams involved in the European Super League formally withdraw from the competition.
Categories: Manchester

European Super League: All six Premier League teams withdraw from competition

BBC London News Feed - 1 hour 7 min ago
All six Premier League teams involved in the European Super League formally withdraw from the competition.

Mother gives birth in dramatic Uber hospital dash

BBC London News Feed - 1 hour 21 min ago
Victoria White's waters broke as she was being driven to hospital to give birth to her second child.

Boris Johnson told Sir James Dyson by text he would 'fix' tax issue

Wiltshire BBC News Feed - 1 hour 24 min ago
The prime minister and businessman sent text messages over plans for ventilators during the pandemic.
Categories: Wiltshire

Local elections 2021: How do Gloucestershire councils spend your money?

BBC Gloucestershire - 1 hour 33 min ago
Ahead of local elections on 6 May, we see how some Gloucestershire councils spend your money.
Categories: Gloucestershire

Local elections 2021: How do Wiltshire's councils spend your money?

Wiltshire BBC News Feed - 1 hour 35 min ago
Ahead of the local elections on 6 May, we break down how Wiltshire's councils spends your money.
Categories: Wiltshire

Local elections 2021: How does Bristol City Council spend your money?

Bristol BBC NewsFeed - 1 hour 37 min ago
Ahead of the local elections on 6 May, we break down how Bristol City Council spends your money.
Categories: Bristol

Argos Bridgwater depot to shut putting more than 200 jobs at risk

Somerset BBC News Feed - 1 hour 49 min ago
Parent company Sainsbury's says the Somerset depot closure is part of a "streamlining" operation.
Categories: Somerset

Data items 2021 to 2022

Guidance about every piece of information you need to send us in autumn 2021, spring and summer 2022.
Categories: Education

Generate and submit your return

Information on accessing and using our data collection systems to send us your school census data.
Categories: Education

Find a school census code

List of codes to use when completing your school census.
Categories: Education

Changes from previous school census

Any changes to the information we ask for or how it should be provided since the 2020 to 2021 academic year.
Categories: Education

Census dates

Find out when the school census will open for each term and what to do in unusual circumstances.
Categories: Education

Which schools and pupils to include

Find out which schools and pupils are in scope for the school census.
Categories: Education

Complete the school census

Guidance for schools and local authorities on what data we need and how to submit it.
Categories: Education

Accept working from home as the new normal, insurance industry told

Millions of people might find their insurance policies do not cover them for work-related accidents that take place at home as lockdown eases across the UK, and this is wrong, an insurer has stated. 

Until recently, insurers had to apply home and contents policies to home workers and the self-employed as the country was being urged to stay at home.

Read more: HSBC scraps executive floor in Canary Wharf in favour of hot-desking

However, as government advice changes, some home workers might find they aren’t covered as their policies may be ‘domestic only’.

Jimmy Williams, co-founder and CEO of Urban Jungle, told City A.M. he thinks this is “wrong” and that the traditional insurance industry should simply accept WFH as the ‘new normal’.

“It’s crazy that someone who spills a cuppa on their laptop while working from home might not be covered by their contents insurance,” Williams said.

“We think that it’s time all insurance policies officially reflected the big changes that are taking place in society. Changes such as flexible working, variable circumstances and an abundance of digital devices,” he added.

“The lines between work and home are likely to remain blurred for some time. So I think what everyone wants is flexibility, and it’s time that the insurance industry reflected that.”

Read more: A third of bosses think working from home has boosted productivity

Rise of the ‘shoffice’

Some people have made big changes to their homes to cope better with WFH. Sheds have been turned into offices, sprouting a new term ‘the shoffice’, Williams pointed out.

“The rise of the ‘shoffice’ is just another example of the fast-moving, dynamic world in which we live. I think young people are often ready and willing to embrace change,” he added.

“But they don’t always feel supported by major service providers such as banks, insurance companies and government.”

Home working pledges made by the Association of British Insurers (ABI) are next reviewed and updated at the end of this month, on 30 April, meaning there could be disputes pitting the self-employed and homeworkers against the insurance industry, Williams concluded.

Read more: World’s largest law firm Dentons to offer permanent home working

The post Accept working from home as the new normal, insurance industry told appeared first on CityAM.

Categories: City of London

Netflix catches a chill while inflation is knocking

When you see American Airlines fall 8 per cent because it announced a bigger-than-expected loss in the first quarter, you are fine with that information.

But when you see Netflix plunge 10 per cent after-market because it missed estimates, that’s a shocker.

Read more: UK inflation climbs to 0.7 per cent in March

Netflix surprised to the downside yesterday, according to Ipek Ozkardeskaya, a senior analyst at Swissquote, because the company added less than 4m subscriptions in the first quarter versus 6m expected by analysts and said it expects to add just one more million in the June quarter.

“That’s a quarter of the 4m expected by analysts. So, the low production costs helped but didn’t compensate for the slow revenue stream due to less production as well,” she said.

“It appears that Netflix started feeling the pinch of the end of the lockdown measures and the company could be reaching its potential for now, Ozkardeskaya added.

Read more: Production delays weigh on Netflix as firm misses new subscriber forecasts

Elsewhere, Johnson & Johnson posted stronger-than-expected earnings and its vaccine will continue being given in Europe despite some issues.

But more importantly, Ozkardeskaya stressed, Procter&Gamble said it will increase its products price due to higher raw material prices. 

“Ouch for parents, Pampers’s price will go higher, and ouch for the economy, because that’s how we will start seeing a further and perhaps a sustainable jump in inflation moving forward,” she explained.

Read more: Johnson & Johnson posts $100m in Covid19 vaccine sales as profit beats expectations

Fed

The Federal Reserve (Fed) head Jerome Powell said that any rise in inflation won’t last long enough to compromise the Fed’s inflation target of ‘an average of 2 per cent’, but as long as the price increases are justified by rising raw material costs, Ozkardeskaya thinks it may.  

“For now, the US yields show no signs of stress, however. The 10-year benchmark is back to 1.56 per cent. But at this point, I start questioning whether the rising inflation, and stronger case for a more hawkish Fed policy isn’t just a way to say stop to the speculative price actions that we see in unexpected assets.”

Read more: Barclaycard defends decision to cut customers’ credit limits by 95 per cent

“Could the 8700 per cent rally in Dogecoin explain why Jerome Powell seems so detached regarding the rising inflationary pressures? Because one thing that makes speculation so appealing for people who would not speculate otherwise is the fact that the low-risk assets, such as US or European treasuries do no longer compensate their holders.”

There is a huge pool of negative yielding debt in the market, Ozkardeskaya continued.

“By the end of last year, it was just about $18 trillion; no wonder people look for alternatives. What’s crazier: paying to hold the German debt or buying Dogecoin. It’s open for discussion,” she concluded.

Read more: UK inflation climbs to 0.7 per cent in March

The post Netflix catches a chill while inflation is knocking appeared first on CityAM.

Categories: City of London